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Vocabulary Questions In The Reading Comprehensions

 

Given below are the two passages for the test of Vocabulary questions in the Reading Comprehensions for CLAT (Common Law Admission Test) and other law entrance exams. The difficulty level of the questions is from very easy to easy. Attempt the questions and check your score.

Passage 1

The DMK political scion Udhayanidhi Stalin’s recent visit to the Dharmapuram Adheenam in Mayiladuthurai, Tamil Nadu, and his interaction with the mutt head has been seen as a continuation of the party’s attempts to wriggle out of the uncomfortable anti-Hindu tag. Unlike his father M K Stalin, who had courted controversy recently by allegedly refusing to accept the sacred ash at a function in Pasumpon near Madurai, Udhayanidhi was seen bowing down to the seer as he smeared the ash on his forehead.  This gesture is certainly a marked shift from the party’s strict — (1) — posture that it had derived from its parent, the Dravida Kazhagam, known for its stand against Hindu rituals and idol worship.

A few days after his son’s mutt visit, Stalin told his party cadre that the DMK was not against Hindus and that the party had performed the kudamuzhuku (consecration) festival in over 5,000 temples between 1967 and 1975. His reiteration of the DMK’s commitment to this section of the populace was purportedly to counter the BJP’s campaign cry that the Dravidian party was not going to be sympathetic to them.

This slow shifting of the DMK’s ideological stand was seen early last year when its mouthpiece, Murasoli, had carried a little box titled: ‘Not supporting Hindus is wrong’. The article was published after an old video in which Stalin was seen criticising Hindu marriage rituals was being circulated. In today’s political landscape, the emergence of the BJP with its much-publicised Vel Yatra seems to have added tenor to the DMK’s till-now soft voice, forcing the party to tweak its strategy to win over the section of the populace that may be swayed by the saffron wave.

To this end, the DMK has already begun moving towards establishing itself as a party that is inclusive to avoid the anti-Hindu tag. However, this seems to have created discomfort among the hardcore members, who are still holding on to the party’s Dravida Kazhagam roots. It now remains to be seen how much the DMK will bend from its ethos to take on the AIADMK-BJP combine in the volatile election battlefield in 2021.

Source

Questions
  1. The best-suited word for (1) is
  • Physiological
  • Psychological
  • Ideological
  • Physical
  1. The word in bold in the passage means
  • To avoid doing
  • To shake
  • To enter
  • None of these
  1. The phrase ‘tweak its strategy’ in the passage refers to:
  • Admire the plan
  • Break the plan
  • Twist the plan
  • None of the above
  1. The meaning of the word reiteration is
  • To irritate again
  • To say something again
  • Both (a) and (b)
  • None of the above
  1. Which of the following words is the antonym of volatile?
  • Uniform
  • Fickle
  • Uncertain
  • None of the above

Passage 2

One of the great successes of the Republican Party in recent decades is the relentless propagation of a simple formula for economic growth: tax cuts. The formula doesn’t work, but that has not affected its popularity. In part, that’s because people like tax cuts. But it’s also because people like economic growth, and while the cult of tax cuts has attracted many critics, it lacks for obvious rivals. Democratic politicians have tended to campaign on helping people left behind by economic growth, the difficulties caused by economic growth and the problems that cannot be addressed by economic growth. When Democrats do talk about encouraging economic growth, they often sound like Republicans with a few misgivings — the party of kinder, better tax cuts.

This is not just a —(1)— problem for Democrats; it is an economic problem for the United States. The nation needs a better story about the drivers of economic growth, to marshal support for better public policies. The painful lessons of recent decades, along with recent economic research, — (2) —to a promising candidate: higher wages. Raising the wages of American workers ought to be the priority of economic policymakers and the measure of economic performance under the Biden administration. We’d all be better off paying less attention to quarterly updates on the growth of the nation’s gross domestic product and focusing instead on the growth of workers’ paychecks. Set aside, for the moment, the familiar arguments for higher wages: fairness, equality of opportunity, ensuring Americans can — (3) — for their families. The argument here is that higher wages can stoke the sputtering engine of economic growth.

Perhaps the most famous illustration of the benefits is the story of Henry Ford’s decision in 1914 to pay $5 a day to workers on his Model T assembly lines. He did it to increase production — he was paying a premium to maintain a reliable workforce. The unexpected benefit was that Ford’s factory workers became Ford customers, too.

Source

Questions
  1. The best-suited word for (1) is
  • Economical
  • Social
  • Political
  • None of the above
  1. The meaning of the phrase ‘stoke the sputtering engine’ is
  • Fuel the damaged engine
  • Stop the moving engine
  • Replace the damaged engine
  • None of the above
  1. The least used word for (2) is
  • Point
  • Indicate
  • Encourage
  • Both (a) and (b)
  1. The best-suited word for (3) is
  • Provide
  • Snatch
  • Steal
  • None of these

Answers

Passage 1

  1. (c)
  2. (a)
  3. (c)
  4. (b)
  5. (a)

Passage 2

  1. (c)
  2. (a)
  3. (d)
  4. (a)

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