Practice Questions on Offences Against Body

Practice Questions on Offences Against Body

  • During a fight between ‘A’ and ‘B’ the two women, ‘A’ pulls ‘B’ by hair and removes some of her hair. ‘A’ is guilty of :

  • Simple hurt

  • Grievous hurt

  • Simple hurt by rash and negligent act

  • Grievous hurt by rash and negligent act

Ans. a

Rationale: The definition of hurt covers bodily pain except so slight a harm of which no person of ordinary sense or temper would complain of. However, the degree or severity of pain is not a material factor.

  • Which of the following has not been designated as grievous hurt under IPC?

  • Dislocation of a tooth

  • Emasculation

  • Temporary loss of hearing capacity

  • Temporary privation of any member or joint

Ans. c

Rationale:​​ The following kinds of hurt only are desig­nated as “grievous”:​​ Emasculation, permanent privation of the sight of either eye, permanent privation of the hearing of either ear,​​ privation of any member or join, destruction or permanent impairing of the powers of any member or joint, permanent disfiguration of the head or face, fracture or dislocation of a bone or tooth​​ or any hurt which endangers life or which causes the sufferer to be during the space of twenty days in severe bodily pain, or unable to follow his ordinary pursuits.

  • A struck his wife B on the head a single blow with a roller pin. B fell down bleeding from nose and became senseless. ‘A’thinking that B was dead hung her with a piece of rope from ceiling which actually caused B’s death. A is guilty of:

  • Culpable homicide

  • Grievous hurt

  • Murder

  • None of the above

Ans. b

Rationale: ‘A’ intended to cause only grievous hurt and not death. A assumed B to be dead when he hung her from rope, A can maximum be maid liable for tampering with evidence and grievous hurt but not for murder or culpable homicide because he lacked the requisite mens rea.

  • Which one of the following is not an illustration of grievous hurt?

  • Emasculation

  • Dislocation of bone

  • Permanent disfiguration of face

  • Hurt which causes the suffer in severe bodily pain for the period of 15 days

Ans. d

Rationale:​​ The following kinds of hurt only are desig­nated as “grievous”:​​ Emasculation, permanent privation of the sight of either eye, permanent privation of the hearing of either ear,​​ privation of any member or join, destruction or permanent impairing of the powers of any member or joint, permanent disfiguration of the head or face, fracture or dislocation of a bone or tooth​​ or any hurt which endangers life or which causes the sufferer to be during the space of twenty days in severe bodily pain, or unable to follow his ordinary pursuits.

  • Section 326B in IPC which was added by Criminal Law Amendment Act 2013 refers to

  • Grievous hurt by dangerous weapon

  • Trafficking of a person

  • Throwing or attempt to throw acid

  • Sexual assault

Ans. c

Rationale: According to section 326 B the attempt of throwing acid is also punishable. The cases of acid attack were earlier covered under the offence of grievous hurt but after the 2013 Amendment a separate offence by the name of acid attack has been created under Section 326 A and 326 B of Indian Penal Code (IPC).

  • ‘A’ intentionally pulls a woman’s veil without her consent to make her afraid of, is liable for:

  • Assault

  • Criminal force

  • Hurt

  • Defamation

Ans. b

Rationale: hitting, touching or striking a person with an intention to commit some offence or to cause fear, injury or annoyance to the other constitutes the offence of criminal force.

  • ‘A’ shakes his fist at ‘Z’ intending or knowing it to be likely that he may thereby cause ‘Z’ to believe that ‘A’ is about to strike ‘Z’. A has committed:

  • Use of force

  • Use of criminal force

  • Assault

  • Use of force and assault both

Ans. c

Rationale: A person shall be liable for the offence of assault if he makes a gesture or preparation to use criminal force in the presence of victim with an intention or knowledge to cause apprehension in the mind of the victim that such force shall be used against him

  • A spits over B. He would be liable for the offence of:

  • Annoyance

  • Assault

  • Using criminal force

  • Defamation

Ans. c

Rationale: hitting, touching or striking a person with an intention to commit some offence or to cause fear, injury or annoyance to the other constitutes the offence of criminal force.

  • Which of the following is not an illustration of assault?

  • ‘A’ take up a stick saying to ‘B’, “I will beat you”

  • ‘A’ threatens to ‘B’ to see him later on

  • ‘A’ medically examines a woman ‘B’ without her consent

  • ‘A’ throws brickbats into the house of ‘B’

Ans. b

Rationale: A person shall be liable for the offence of assault if he makes a gesture or preparation to use criminal force in the presence of victim with an intention or knowledge to cause apprehension in the​​ mind of the victim that such force shall be used against him. A mere threat does not constitute assault.

  • ‘A’ incites a dog to spring upon ‘Z’ without Z’s​​ consent with the intention to annoy ‘Z’. A has committed the offence of:

  • Criminal force

  • Criminal assault

  • Grievous hurt

  • Defamation

Ans. a

Rationale: hitting, touching or striking a person with an intention to commit some offence or to cause fear, injury or annoyance to the other constitutes the offence of criminal force.

 

 

 

 

Read our previous post on offences against property under ipc here.

Take our test on offences against property under ipc here.

Read our post on the Landmark Judgements of 2019-2020.

Read our post on Elements of Crime.

Read CLATapult’s post on offer and acceptance here. Also, try their mocks for more legal reasoning practice questions.

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