Practice Paper on Spelling Correction Questions for CLAT 2021

SPELLING CORRECTION

Passage 1

(source:​​ https://learnenglish.britishcouncil.org/general-english/magazine/you-and-your-data​​ )

As the internet and digital technology become a bigger part of our lives, more of our data becomes publicly accessible, leading to questions about privacy. So, how do we interact with the growing digital world without compromising the security of our information and our right to privacy?​​ Imagine that you want to learn a new language. You search​​ ‘Is German a difficult language?’​​ on your phone. You click on a link and read an article with advice for learning German. There’s a search function to find German courses, so you enter your city name. It asks you to activate location services to find courses near you. You click​​ ‘accept’. You then message a German friend to ask for her advise. When you look her up on social media, an advertisement for a book and an app called German for​​ Beginners​​ instantly pops up. Later the same day, while you’re sending an email, you see an advert offering you a discount at a local language school. How did they know? The simple answer is online data. At all stages of your search, your devices, websites and applications were collecting data on your preferences and tracking your behaviour online.​​ ‘They’​​ have been following you.​​ In the past, it was easy for people to keep track of their personal information. Like their​​ possessions, people’s information existed mostly in physical form: on paper, kept in a folder, locked in a cupboard or an office. Today, our personal information can be collected and stored online, and it’s​​ accessible​​ to more people than ever before. Many of us share our physical location, our travel plans, our political opinions, our​​ shopping​​ interests and our family photos online – as key services like ordering a takeaway meal, booking a plane, taking part in a poll or buying new clothes now take place online and require us to give out our data. Every search you make, service you use, message you send and item you buy is part of your​​ ‘digital footprint’. Companies and online platforms use this​​ ‘footprint’​​ to track exactly what we are doing, from what links we click on to how much time we spend on a website. Based on your online activity, they can guess what you are interested in and what things you might want to buy. Knowing so much about you gives online platforms and companies a lot of power and a lot of money. By selling your data or providing targeted content, companies can turn your online activity into profit. This is the foundation of the growing industry of digital marketing.​​ Some​​ of the time our personal data is shared online with our consent. We post our birthday, our photographs and even our opinions online on social media. We know that this information is publicly accessible. However, our data often travels further than we realise, and can be used in ways that we did not intend. Certain news scandals about data breaches, where personal data has been lost, leaked or shared without consent, have recently made people much more aware of the potential dangers of sharing information online.​​ So, can we do anything to protect our data? Or should we just accept that in fact nothing is​​ ‘free’​​ and sharing our data is the price we have to pay for using many online services? As people are increasingly aware of and worried about data protection, governments and organisations are taking a more active role in protecting privacy. For example, the European Union passed the General Data Protection Law, which regulates how personal information is collected online. However, there is still much work to be done.​​ As internet users, we should all have a say in how our data is used. It is important that we pay more attention to how data is acquired, where it is stored and how it is used. As the ways in which we use the internet continue to grow and change, we will need to stay informed and keep demanding new laws and regulations, and better information about how to protect ourselves. Safer Internet Day is an ideal time to find out more about this​​ topic.

Question: identify the correct spelling of the words used in the passage from the following​​ 

  • 1.​​ Accesible

2.​​ Accessible

3.​​ Acessible

4. Acesible​​ 

Ans. 2

Rationale:​​ When any suffix is added to a word which ends with a consonant with a vowel before it then the last letter of the word gets doubled

  • 1. Advice

2. Advise

3. Advize

4.​​ Addvice

Ans. 1

Rationale:​​ ‘advise’ is a verb​​ which means to counsel and ‘advice’ is a noun which means recommendation. In the passage the meaning of the sentence suits with ‘advice’.

 

  • 1. Beginners

2.​​ Begginners

3.​​ Beginer

4.​​ Begginer​​ 

Ans.1

Rationale:​​ When any suffix is added to a word which ends with a consonant with a vowel before it then the last letter of the word gets doubled

  • 1.​​ Posesions

2.​​ Posessions

3. Possesions

4. Possessions

Ans.​​ 4

Rationale:​​ When any suffix is added to a word which ends with a consonant with a vowel before it then the last letter of the word gets doubled

  • 1.​​ Shopping

2.​​ Shoping

3.​​ Shhoping

4.​​ Shopping

Ans. 1

Rationale:​​ When any suffix is added to a word which ends with a consonant with a vowel before it then the last letter of the word gets doubled.

 

 

Passage 2​​ 

(source:​​ https://learnenglish.britishcouncil.org/general-english/magazine/thanksgiving​​ )

Thanksgiving combines the traditions of different groups of people. Travellers and migrants brought different religious traditions from Europe to the United States and Canada. Several celebrations are claimed as the first Thanksgiving. The best known is the celebration held by the pilgrims in what is now Plymouth, Massachusetts after their journey across the Atlantic Ocean on the​​ famous Mayflower ship. Like the pilgrims, many groups held days of prayer, fasting or feasting to give thanks for​​ successfully​​ making the long boat journey. Later,​​ settlers​​ celebrated their successful harvest in a new land by holding feasts with their Native American neighbours. Over time, the Canadian and American traditions have become similar and developed into the modern holiday of Thanksgiving.​​ In Canada, Thanksgiving is celebrated on the second Monday in October. In the United States, it is on the fourth Thursday in November. Although its origins are religious, today, Thanksgiving is a largely secular holiday. For most Americans and Canadians, it is a day for coming together with family and friends to share a large meal. It is an occasion to spend time with loved ones and express gratitude for the year that has passed. In many households there is a tradition of everyone seated at the table sharing what they are most grateful for.​​ Thanksgiving is also about food. Thanksgiving dinner​​ traditionally​​ includes roast turkey, mashed potatoes, cranberry sauce and, for dessert, apple, pumpkin or pecan pies. Every family has its own recipes, sometimes secret recipes handed down through generations. Turkey, a bird native to North America, is the unofficial mascot of Thanksgiving, with roast turkey on the menu and turkey decorations on the wall. In the United States, a tradition of gifting turkeys to the President has more recently evolved into a humorous turkey ‘pardoning’. At this light-hearted ceremony, the President issues an official pardon for one or two turkeys, saving them from being cooked for supper.​​ Beyond food and gratitude, there are some unexpected sides to the American and Canadian holiday. One of these is football. This popular sport is an important part of the holiday, when families gather around to cheer on local or national teams. American football and Canadian football are both similar to rugby, played​​ primarily​​ not with the feet but with the hands.​​ Parades are another common part of the festivities. In the United States, the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade takes place in New York City on the morning of Thanksgiving. It’s one of the world’s largest parades and is broadcast nationwide. A similar Thanksgiving parade happens in Canada as part of the Kitchener–Waterloo Oktoberfest, a multi-day autumn festival.​​ Unfortunately, heavy traffic is also common at Thanksgiving. In both countries, the week of Thanksgiving is one of the most popular travel times of the year, as everyone heads home to visit their extended family. So try to avoid any road trips if you’re visiting North America during this holiday!

 

Question: identify the correct spelling of the words used in the passage from the following​​ 

  • 1. Settlers

2. Setllers

3.​​ Settllers

4. Setelers

Ans. 1

Rationale:​​ When any suffix is added to a word which ends with a consonant with a vowel before it then the last letter of the word gets doubled

  • 1. Traditionaly

2.​​ Traditionally

3. Traditionali

4. Traditionly

Ans.​​ 2

Rationale:​​ When the suffix ‘ly’ is added to the adjectives ending with the letter ‘l’ then the letter ‘l’ gets doubled

  • 1. Successfully

2. Sucesfully

3. Succesfuly

4.​​ Sucessfully

Ans.​​ 1

Rationale:​​ When the suffix ‘ly’ is added to the adjectives ending with the letter ‘l’ then the letter ‘l’ gets doubled

  • 1. Primarylly

2. Primarilly

3.​​ Primaryly

4.​​ Primarily

Ans.​​ 4

Rationale:​​ When suffixes er, est, ly, ful, and ness are added to the nouns and adjectives ending with ‘y’ with a vowel before them, then ‘y’ is changed into ‘i’

  • 1. Unfortunately

2.​​ Unfortunitely

3. Unfortunatelly

4. Unfortunitelly

 

Ans.​​ 1

Rationale:​​ When the suffix ‘ly’ is added to a word in which ‘e’ is silent then the letter ‘e’ is retained in that word.

 

 

 

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