Passage Based Vocabulary Practice Questions for CLAT 2020

Passage Based Vocabulary Practice Questions for CLAT 2020

Passage 1

Source: (http://www.english-for-students.com/stories-for-students.html)

There​​ was once a wrestler called Vijay Singh. A tall man with massive shoulders and muscular arms, he towered over others like a giant. Vijay Singh, people said, was a born wrestler and could beat all other wrestlers in the world.​​ This pahalwan had but one shortcoming which often landed him in awkward situations. He was fond of boasting. One day, he was sitting in the market-place surrounded by several young men. After drinking many glasses of milk, he suddenly proclaimed, “Why are people afraid of ghosts? I am not. I wish I met a stout ghost. I’d teach him a lesson.​​ There were murmurs of applause as well as apprehension among the young men. “If you walk alone at night through the Haunted Desert," one of them said, “you are sure to meet ghosts. They roam there freely. Strange shrieks and moans can be heard all over the place. Travellers have been looted and killed. Would you really want to go there?" Vijay Singh’s mighty heart missed a beat or two. Why did he have to boast? “Yes, I have heard of the Haunted Desert," he said nonchalantly. “I think it’s just a fairy tale."​​ “Oh no," said one of his admirers, “it’s true. This place is ten miles to the west on the road to Jaisalmer. The landmark is an ugly black rock that looks like the head of a camel. Beyond that there is nothing but sand and wilderness and, of course, ghosts.​​ Almost the entire village turned up that evening to bid farewell to Vijay Singh, who was ready to set out west. Just then an old woman came forward and thrust a small packet into his hands, and Vijay Singh started walking into the red sunset of the desert.​​ As he walked, the night deepened. The moon was bright and the stars shone clearly in the Rajasthan sky. Still a few miles short of his destination, Vijay Singh remembered the old woman’s packet. He opened it and found nothing but a lump of salt and an egg. The old woman was well-known for her eccentricities.​​ As Vijay Singh stepped into the Haunted Desert, he heard a voice. “Vijay Singh, Vijay Singh! You will get lost in the desert. Come this way. I am your friend, Natwar." At once Vijay Singh realised it was not his friend but a ghost. Trying to sound brave, he called back, “Where are you, my dear Natwar? It’s dark and I cannot see you. Come here and show me the way." Like all good wrestlers, Vijay Singh wanted to size​​ up his enemy.​​ Soon the ghost appeared at his side. Vijay Singh peered into his face and declared, “You are just a plain, lying ghost. Anyway, now I don’t​​ have​​ to walk all night. I was longing to meet you." Not used to insults, the ghost was taken aback. People generally started back in horror when they met him.​​ They often fainted. But here was this unfeeling creature claiming he wanted to meet a ghost. It didn’t make sense. “Really, I don’t know why you longed to meet me," the ghost said.​​ “That proves," said Vijay Singh in a bored voice, “that you are a stupid ghost. The least a ghost can do is to read a man’s thoughts. However, a worthless ghost like you is better than no ghost. The fact is, I am tired of wrestling with men. I want to fight a ghost."​​ The ghost was speechless. Marshalling his ghostly wits, he made an attempt to look Vijay Singh scornfully in the eye. “Frankly," he said, “you don’t appear all that strong to me." “Appearances can be deceptive," Vijay Singh said. “Take your own case. You claim to be Natwar, though actually you are a rascal of a ghost. If you doubt my strength, let me give you a demonstration of it.

Question: indentify the word from the passage which has the same meaning as given in the question.

  • The act of announcing something publicly

  • nonchalantly

  • proclamation

  • apprehension

  • thrust

Ans. b

Rationale:​​ proclamation means to announce something publicly or officially.​​ It is used in sentence ‘After drinking many glasses of milk, he suddenly proclaimed, “Why are people afraid of ghosts? I am not.’

  • Feeling or expressing disdain or contempt​​ 

  • scornfully

  • apprehension

  • wilderness

  • marshalling

Ans. a

Rationale:​​ scornfully means expressing someone is unworthy or disdain. It is used in sentence ‘Marshalling his ghostly wits, he made an attempt to look Vijay Singh scornfully in the eye.’

  • A person of unconventional behaviour

  • Shriek​​ 

  • Wilderness​​ 

  • Apprehension​​ 

  • Eccentricities​​ 

Ans. d

Rationale:​​ Eccentricities refers to the quality of a person of carrying unconventional or strange behaviour or views. It is used in sentence ‘The old woman was well-known for her eccentricities’.

  • A neglected or abandoned area

  • Sand​​ 

  • Eccentricities​​ 

  • Wilderness​​ 

  • Ugly​​ 

Ans. c

Rationale:​​ Wilderness refers to a neglected or abandoned area. It is used in sentence ‘Beyond that there is nothing but sand and wilderness and, of course, ghosts’.

  • High pitched piercing cry

  • Moan​​ 

  • Nonchalantly

  • Murmur​​ 

  • Shriek

Ans. d

Rationale:​​ Shriek refers to a high pitched piercing cry or a sound. It is used in sentence ‘Strange shrieks and moans can be heard all over the place.’

Passage 2

Source: (http://www.english-for-students.com/stories-for-students.html)

Hercules was a strong and brave man. He lived in Greece. The King was jealous of Hercules. People might make Hercules the King. Therefore he wanted to get rid of Hercules. He set difficult tasks for Hercules to keep him away from the country so that he would not be a possible threat to him (the King).​​ Once he asked Hercules to get three golden apples. Some trees were said to bear golden apples. These trees were said to be in a place called Hesperides. But no one knew the way to Hesperides. So the King thought of Hesperides. Hercules would be away for a longer period.​​ Hercules set out on the journey. At first he​​ met three maidens during the journey. Hercules asked them the way to Hesperides. They told him to ask the old man of the sea. But they also warned him, “Hold the old man of the sea tightly. Otherwise he will escape. No one else knows the way."​​ Hercules saw the old man. He was sleeping on the shore. He was looking strange. He had long hair and a beard. Hercules walked to him without making any noise. Then he seized him very firmly.​​ The old man of the sea opened his eyes. He was surprised. He changed himself into a stag. He tried to free himself from the grip of Hercules. But Hercules held him tight. Then the old man changed himself into a sea-bird and then to other animal forms. But he could not free himself from the clutches of Hercules, because Hercules was making his clutches tighter and tighter. Finally the old man said to Hercules, “Who are you? What do you want from me?"​​ Hercules replied, “I am Hercules. Tell me the way to Hesperides."​​ The old man said, “It is an island. Go along the sea-shore. You will meet a giant. He will show you the way to Hesperides."​​ Hercules continued his journey. He met the giant. The giant was very huge and strong. He was sleeping on the shore. Hercules woke him up. The giant was angry. He struck Hercules with a club. Hercules charged at the giant. He lifted the giant and threw him down. But the giant got up immediately. He had become ten times stronger.​​ Hercules threw him down again and again. But each time the giant rose up much stronger. Then Hercules lifted the giant high up in the air. But he did not throw him down. The giant slowly lost all his strength. He now pleaded with Hercules to put him down on the earth. Hercules asked him to tell the way to Hesperides. The giant asked Hercules to meet Atlas. He told him the way to the place where Atlas was.​​ Hercules continued his journey.​​ 

Question: indentify the word from the passage which has the same meaning as given in the question.

  • To take hold of something suddenly

  • Shore​​ 

  • Seize​​ 

  • Tightly

  • Firmly​​ 

Ans. b

Rationale:​​ Seize refers to take hold of something suddenly and forcibly. It is used in the sentence ‘Hercules walked to him without making any noise. Then he seized him very firmly’.

  • An unmarried girl or woman

  • Atlas​​ 

  • Maiden​​ 

  • Stag​​ 

  • Club​​ 

Ans. b

Rationale:​​ maiden refers to an unmarried girl or woman. It is used in the sentence ‘At first he met three maidens during the journey.’

  • To grasp something tightly​​ 

  • Shore​​ 

  • Seize​​ 

  • Stag​​ 

  • Clutches​​ 

Ans. d

Rationale:​​ Clutches refer to grasp something tightly.​​ It is used in the sentence ‘But he could not free himself from the clutches of Hercules, because Hercules was making his clutches tighter and tighter.’

  • Short staff or stick of wood

  • Club​​ 

  • Clutches​​ 

  • Hesperides

  • Stag​​ 

Ans. a

Rationale:​​ Club refers to a short staff or stick of wood welded as a weapon. It is used in the sentence ‘The giant was angry. He struck Hercules with a club.’

  • A male deer

  • Maiden​​ 

  • Clutches​​ 

  • Hercules​​ 

  • Stag​​ 

Ans. d

Rationale:​​ Stag refers to a male deer.​​ It is used in the sentence ‘The old man of the sea opened his eyes. He was surprised. He changed himself into a stag’.

 

 

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