Mock Questions for Practice on English Language for CLAT 2020

Mock Questions for Practice on English Language for CLAT 2020

PASSAGE 1

The nomination of Kamala Harris for vice-president on the Democratic ticket in the US presidential elections has sent India into raptures. Indians, Tamils, Tamil Brahmins, even AIADMK party men, have gone wild with joy. In their book, she has won already. Chitthis of the world are ecstatic at being under the spotlight. Soon, even the Beasant Nagar A-block Residents Welfare Association may pass a resolution that all ex-residents of this south Chennai neighbourhood, now in the US, must stand with her. The predominant sentiment is of pride in “our girl”. Even the strategic community believes she is going to be “good for India”, for H1B visas, for trade, and generally for India-US relations, never mind that the elections are still ahead. As for Joe Biden, the presidential candidate, he is a footnote in all the debate about Harris and her Indian family. What will certainly not be discussed at all, or as much, are the home truths about India that Senator Harris’s nomination and her extraordinary journey serve to highlight. For one, a majoritarian democracy like the one India has become in the 21st century could not have produced a Kamala Harris. As a woman, and a member of a racial and ethnic minority in the US, Harris’s rise to the top levels of the American polity, like President Barack Obama’s, was possible because of a system that recognises and accepts diversity. True, the recent protests in the United States have demonstrated that America’s oldest fault line is not just alive, it has grown wider and deeper in many respects. But the country’s democratic instincts run deep too. What has also been evident over the last few months is an acute awareness about the dangers of white supremacism, and the institutional, political, media and civil society pushback to prevent its rise, and President Donald Trump’s own attempts to fan it. Black political representation is not a rarity. Data on the Pew Research Centre site shows that despite uneven progress, Black political leadership in the US has risen over the last 50 years, and is today at par with the share of blacks in the population. In 2019, there were 52 black representatives, the highest number since 1965, comprising 12 per cent of the House — about the percentage of blacks, the largest racial minority in the US, whose share in the population is about 13.5 per cent. While there are only three black senators (including Harris) and no black governors, overall, the trend is more representative than less. This is the ecosystem in which Harris grew as a politician. Notwithstanding her Tamil Brahmin ancestry, the comparison to Harris’s political rise in the US has to be with the shrinking space today for Muslim politicians in India, and the lack of all kinds of diversity in non-political arenas as well.​​ 

QUESTIONS

  • In whose books Kamala Harris has already done?

  • Indians,

  • ​​ Tamils,​​ 

  • Tamil Brahmins,​​ 

  • All the above

Ans. d

Rationale: The nomination of Kamala Harris for vice-president on the Democratic ticket in the US presidential elections has sent India into raptures. Indians, Tamils, Tamil Brahmins, even AIADMK party men, have gone wild with joy. In their book, she has won already.

  • The predominant sentiment is of pride in “our girl”. The author has used the phrase ‘our girl’ in whose reference?

  • Tamil Brahmins

  • Joe Biden

  • Kamala Harris

  • None of the above

Ans. c

Rationale: The nomination of Kamala Harris for vice-president on the Democratic ticket in the US presidential elections has sent India into raptures. The predominant sentiment is of pride in “our girl”.

  • How will Kamala Harris prove good for India?

  • political, media and civil society pushback will prevent the rise

  • H1B visas and trade will be favourable

  • Both a and b

  • None of the above

Ans. b

Rationale: Even the strategic community believes she is going to be “good for India”, for H1B visas, for trade, and generally for India-US relations, never mind that the elections are still ahead.

  • How was the rise of Kamala Harris possible?

  • Because India has majoritarian democracy

  • Black political leadership in the US has risen

  • US system that recognises and accepts diversity

  • All the above

Ans. c

Rationale: For one, a majoritarian democracy like the one India has become in the 21st century could not have produced a Kamala Harris. As a woman, and a member of a racial and ethnic minority in the US, Harris’s rise to the top levels of the American polity, like President Barack Obama’s, was possible because of a system that recognises and accepts diversity.

  • Identify the suffix or prefix used in the word ‘extraordinary’​​ 

  • Ex

  • Extra

  • Ry

  • Nary

Ans. b

Rationale: ‘extra’ is the prefix used in the word extraordinary because if we take ‘ex’ is the prefix then the remaining word would not have any meaning.

PASSAGE 2

Over the past month or so, leading economic indicators have pointed towards a two-paced recovery. Sales of tractors and two-wheelers, proxies of rural demand, appear to have rebounded strongly, indicating that the pickup in rural areas has been swifter than in the urban centres which have borne the brunt of the COVID-19 pandemic. In large part, this optimism over the relatively stronger rural recovery stems from the healthy performance of the agricultural sector which was excluded from the lockdown restrictions. As per CARE Ratings, the agriculture, forestry and fishing sector is likely to grow by 3.5 per cent in the first quarter of the current financial year. This, as reported in this paper, implies that for the first time since quarterly estimates of growth have been published, the farm sector is likely to register positive growth even as the rest of the economy (barring the government sector) contracts. The last time the economy had contracted was in 1979-80 by 5.2 per cent, but that year, agricultural GDP had also registered a contraction. The strong performance of the farm sector has been on the back of a good rabi harvest — the Agriculture Ministry has pegged the output of wheat, chana and other rabi crops at 151.72 million tonnes, up 5.6 per cent from last year. Further, a favourable monsoon season — rains were 7 per cent above the long-term average as on August 21 — also bodes well for agriculture. Total area under kharif coverage was up 9 per cent as compared to the previous year. Higher food inflation in some commodities may also lead to greater realisations for farmers. This rise in agricultural activity, coupled with higher allocations to the MGNREGA (total outlay under the scheme has risen to a record high of Rs 1 lakh crore this year) also appears to have led to a sharp drop in rural unemployment during this period, as observed in the CMIE data. However, healthy growth of the farm sector, even if it continues, is unlikely to offset the economic losses suffered by other parts of the economy. The declining share of agriculture in rural household incomes —​​ sectors like construction now account for a sizeable portion — imply​​ that prospects of a broad-based rural recovery remain uncertain. As the Reserve Bank of India noted in its annual report, fuller recovery in rural areas is being “held back by muted wage growth which is still hostage to migrant crisis and associated employment losses.” As rural households depend on sectors like construction, manufacturing, wholesale and retail trade to a greater extent than before, how these activities shape up will determine the pace of revival of the broader rural economy. This in turn depends on the trajectory of the pandemic and is a consequence of how economic activities shape up in urban areas. It is possible that heightened risk aversion, self imposed restrictions, and localised lockdowns continue to be a drag on activities in urban areas, impinging upon rural economic activity as well.

QUESTIONS

  • During the pandemic which sector is expected to flourish?

  • Urban sector

  • Agricultural sector

  • Both a and b

  • None of the above

Ans. b

Rationale: As per CARE Ratings, the agriculture, forestry and fishing sector is likely to grow by 3.5 per cent in the first quarter of the current financial year.

  • What has led to a drop in rural unemployment?

  • Rise in agricultural activity

  • Higher allocations to the MGNREGA

  • Higher food inflation

  • All the above

Ans. d

Rationale: Higher food inflation in some commodities may also lead to greater realisations for farmers. This rise in agricultural activity, coupled with higher allocations to the MGNREGA (total outlay under the scheme has risen to a record high of Rs 1 lakh crore this year) also appears to have led to a sharp drop in rural unemployment during this period, as observed in the CMIE data.

  • On what sectors is rural household dependant?

  • Construction

  • ​​ Manufacturing

  • Wholesale

  • All the above

Ans. d

Rationale: As rural households depend on sectors like construction, manufacturing, wholesale and retail trade to a greater extent than before, how these activities shape up will determine the pace of revival of the broader rural economy.

  • What is considered as drag in urban areas?

  • self imposed restrictions

  • employment losses

  • muted wage growth

  • food inflation

Ans. a

Rationale: It is possible that heightened risk aversion, self imposed restrictions, and localised lockdowns continue to be a drag on activities in urban areas, impinging upon rural economic activity as well.

  • Identify the word in the passage which has the same meaning as ‘a person who is caught and kept in prison’

  • Pegged

  • Hostage

  • Trajectory

  • Impinging

Ans. b

Rationale: hostage means a person who is caught and kept in prison

 

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