English Language Practice Questions on Tense for CLAT 2020

English Language Practice Questions on Tense​​ for CLAT 2020

PASSAGE 1​​ 

SOURCE:​​ https://learnenglish.britishcouncil.org/general-english/magazine/world-water-day​​ 

World Water Day, 22 March, draws attention to the essential role of water in our lives, the difficulties people face in getting it and solutions to these problems. Water is vital. Between 55 and 60 per cent of the adult body is made of it and every living cell needs it to keep functioning. In normal conditions, the human body can only survive three or four days without water. We need water to stay alive, yet there are billions of people all over the world who do not have access to safe drinking water. The first World Water Day was celebrated in 1993. It was first proposed at the United Nations (UN) conference on environment and development in Rio de Janeiro in 1992 and has had been celebrated annually on 22 March since then. Every year the UN releases its World Water Development Report on or around this date. Each year has a different theme, looking at things like the role of clean water in the world of work, ways to stop wasting water, finding ways to supply water to underprivileged groups and so on. Clean drinking water is fundamental. But it is also vital for sanitation and hygiene. It is estimated that more than 700 children under the age of seven die every day from illnesses linked to unsafe water and poor sanitation. The right to water and sanitation was recognised as a human right by the UN General Assembly in 2010. However, there are still at least 2.1 billion people around the world who live without safe water in their homes. These include rural communities, people who have been displaced due to war and local conflicts and areas where climate change is making water more​​ and more​​ scarce. Apart from the obvious health issues, a lack of accessible clean water means that people – often women and children – spend hours every day walking to and from distant water supplies. This means they don't have time to dedicate to work, studies and other domestic duties. The search for water becomes their main occupation. And people who are not able to walk to get their own water are particularly vulnerable. ​​ 

For many people, access to water has become increasingly difficult due to increased demand for a finite resource. According to figures released by the​​ UN, around 4 billion people – nearly two-thirds of the world's population – experience severe water scarcity during at least one month of the year. It is believed that by 2030 as many as 700 million people worldwide could be displaced by intense water scarcity. There are many charities working on creating sustainable supplies of clean water at a grass-roots level for different communities around the world, and this important work needs to continue and to expand. But the fundamental problem of increasing demand for a limited resource can only be addressed by more efficient use of water, especially in industry and agriculture. Waste-water recycling, capturing rainwater, more efficient irrigation techniques and reforestation are all examples of how water can be used more efficiently. As individuals, what we can do to help is support charities, raise awareness, take part in the World Water Day events that are happening all around the world and, of course, be careful with how we use water in our own lives.​​ 

Read the following sentences and find whether there is any error in any part based on the rules of tense:

  • Between 55 and 60 per cent of the adult body (A) is made of it and (b) every living cell need (C) it to keep functioning (D)

Ans. c

Rationale: instead of ‘need’, ‘needs’ will be used as the term ‘every living cell’ is singular.

  • It was first proposed at the United Nations (UN) conference (A) on environment and development in Rio de Janeiro in 1992 (B) and had been celebrated (C) annually on 22 March since then (D)

Ans. c

Rationale: instead of ‘had’ ‘has’ will be used as in present time also World Water Day is celebrated on 22 March

  • Clean(A) drinking (B) water was (C) fundamental (D)

Ans. c

Rationale: the universal facts always carry present tense with​​ it, therefore instead of ‘was’ ‘is’ will be used.

  • But the fundamental problem of increasing demand​​ (A)​​ for​​ a limited resource can only​​ addressed​​ (B)​​ by more efficient use of water​​ (C), especially in industry and agriculture​​ (D)

Ans. b

Rationale: after ‘only’ ‘be’ shall be used as the sentence talks about addressing the problem in future.

  • These include rural communities, people (A) who had been displaced due to war (B) and local conflicts and areas where climate change is(C) making water more and more scarce (D)

Ans. b

Rationale: instead of ‘had’ ‘have’ will be used as the sentence talks about present displacement of people and its present effect.

PASSAGE 2​​ 

SOURCE:​​ https://learnenglish.britishcouncil.org/general-english/magazine/world-oceans-day​​ 

World Oceans Day is a day to think about the extremely important role that the oceans play in all our lives, the dangers that are facing our oceans and the actions we can take to protect them.​​ Seventy per cent of our planet is covered by one huge, continuous body of seawater – the ocean. It holds 1.35 billion cubic kilometres of water. Nearly half of the ocean is more than 3 kilometres deep. The deepest​​ knowing point of the ocean is in the Mariana Trench, 11 kilometres below sea level. But there may be deeper points that we have not seen, as we have only explored five per cent of the ocean to date. The government of Canada suggested the idea of World Oceans Day at the Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro in 1992. In 2008 the United Nations officially recognised the date and it had been growing ever since, from 100 events in 2008 to over a thousand events in more than 120 countries ten years later. The day is celebrated in a variety of ways, including special events at aquariums and zoos, beach and river clean-ups, school activities, conservation programmes, art contests and film festivals. One of the main aims of the day is to remind people of the important role the ocean plays in our lives. Life​​ begun in the ocean. And the ocean is home to the majority of plants and animals on Earth, from single-cell organisms to the blue whale. Marine plants provide us with 70 per cent of the oxygen we breathe. The ocean controls the climate, providing heat in winter and cool​​ air in summer. It is also​​ providing​​ us with food and medicines as well as transport. No matter where you live on the planet, no matter how far from the sea, your life is dependent on the ocean. The most urgent problem facing the ocean at the moment is plastic pollution. Reducing one-use plastic, including plastic bags and plastic bottles, has been an important theme for World Oceans Day for a number of years. Climate change and rising sea temperatures are also a huge problem. Rising sea temperatures​​ has a direct influence on weather patterns and are seen as partly​​ responsible for an increase in extreme weather conditions. An increase in carbon dioxide is increasing the acid levels of seawater and putting many marine organisms at risk. On World Oceans Day, wear blue, go on a​​ March, find a beach or river clean-up near you, organise a local event, print a poster and put it in your window, or use the hashtag worldoceansday on social media. There are so many things you can do on 8 June to join in the celebrations, to remind people about the importance of the ocean in our lives and to make a difference!

Read the following sentences as given in the passage above and find whether there is any error in any part based on the rules of tense:

  • The deepest knowing (A) point of the ocean is (B) in the Mariana Trench (C), 11 kilometres below sea level (D)

Ans. a

Rationale: instead of ‘knowing’ ‘known’ will be used as with the verb ‘know’ continuous tense is not used.

  • Life (A) begun (B) in (C) the ocean (D).

Ans. b

Rationale: instead of ‘begun’ ‘began’ will be used as with universal facts present tense is used.

  • Rising sea temperatures has (A) a direct influence on weather patterns (B) and are seen as partly responsible for (C) an increase in extreme weather conditions (D)

Ans. a

Rationale: instead of ‘has’ ‘have’ will be used as the term ‘sea temperatures’ is plural.

  • In 2008 the United Nations officially recognised the date (A) and it had been growing ever since (B), from 100 events in 2008 to over a thousand events (C) in more than 120 countries ten years later (D)

Ans. b

Rationale: instead of ‘had’ ‘has’ will be used as the​​ United Nations is growing in present.

  • It also (A) providing us (B) with food and medicines (C) as well as transport (D)

Ans. b

  • Rationale: instead of ‘providing’ ‘provides’ will be used because for the acts which are done regularly we use simple present tense

Questions got you stumped? Read our post on spelling correction.

Read our posts on CLAT English Language.

Read CLATapult’s post on a guide to acing CLAT English.

Read our post on Spotting the Error.

Got doubts about CLAT 2020? Find all your answers and much more here.

Get CLATalogue' Posts in Your Inbox