HomeEnglish LanguageEnglish Language Practice Questions for CLAT UG 2020

English Language Practice Questions for CLAT UG 2020

English Language Practice Questions for CLAT UG 2020

English Language Practice Questions for CLAT UG 2020

Passage 1

With due respect, the highest court in the land has not shown its customary wisdom and institutional grace in the contempt case against Prashant Bhushan. On Monday, it lost another opportunity to correct course. In a 108-page order on August 14, it had convicted Bhushan for scandalising the court by two tweets. Subsequently, it urged him to reconsider his position. Bhushan stood his ground, and the court has now, over 82 pages, argued why it is necessary to punish the lawyer and activist — even though he has a fine record of pursuing public interest litigation, even though the offence itself can be seen to be vague and colonial, even though in striking the balance between rights and restrictions, rights must be deemed fundamental. The court has punished Bhushan despite all these arguments that it takes note of, because, “both the tweets coupled with averments in the reply affidavit are capable of shaking the confidence of the public in the institution as a whole”. It is not just that the court fails once again to persuade that it is acting, not just to protect itself, but, as it claims, to preserve the people’s trust in the administration of justice. It is also that the punishment seems indefensibly disproportionate. If Bhushan does not pay Rupee 1 by September 15, he would be jailed for three months and debarred for three years — having tried and failed to extract an​​ ---(1)--, the court has attached to its token fine an unbecoming or-else.

Bhushan has respectfully accepted the punishment while reserving his right to seek a review. The court will have yet another chance to reconsider — it must not miss it again. These are not the best of times for the court. In recent months, it has invited questions about its lack of alacrity on cases that involve the liberties of the citizen and encroachment by the state. On matters ranging from habeas corpus to electoral bonds, it has attracted criticism for giving the benefit of doubt, and delay, to a powerful executive. It has also been ill at ease within — Monday’s order recalled the unprecedented January press conference of four senior-most judges in 2018. In such times, it is even more necessary for the court to acknowledge that its prestige as the custodian of constitutional values and individual rights is best protected not by rushing to use its punitive powers against those who would criticise it, but by living up to its most capacious institutional self. And by showing its ability to self-correct. Bhushan has​​ admirably held his ground, he should now seek a review so that the Honourable Court has the option to strike down the conviction — and erase this blot.

Source

 

  • The word averment in the passage means:

  • Allegations

  • Defence

  • Proof

  • Evidence

 

  • As per the passage above the primary punishment given to Mr. Bhushan is​​ 

  • Fine of Re. 1

  • Jail for 3 months

  • Debarred for three years

  • Both (a) and (b)

 

  • The best suited word to be​​ filled​​ in (1) is

  • Evidence

  • Proof

  • Apology

  • Statement

 

  • Which of the following words in passage means​​ ‘willingness’?

  • Alacrity

  • Punitive

  • Blot

  • Eagerness

 

  • Which of the following statement is incorrect?

  • Supreme Court is the custodian of Constitutional Values

  • Court has failed earlier also in persuading that it is acting, not just to protect itself, but, as it claims, to preserve the people’s trust in the administration of justice

  • Neither (a) nor (b)

  • Both (a) and (b)

 

Passage 2

Reserve Bank of India (RBI) Governor Shaktikanta Das has warned banks against becoming “overly risk-averse”, which will be “self-defeating”. Bankers have reacted by saying the real problem isn’t risk aversion, but lack of demand for credit. Both are right. Aggregate deposits with banks have risen over Rs 14 lakh crore or 11 per cent year-on-year as on August 14, whereas the corresponding credit growth has been just Rs 5.35 lakh crore (5.5 per cent). Meanwhile, their investments in government securities have gone up by Rs 7.55 lakh crore (21.2 per cent). That, prima facie, indicates banks are in no mood to lend and prefer to park their money in relatively safe sovereign paper. But the fact that banks are now also deploying Rs 6.3-6.4 lakh crore daily with the RBI’s reverse repo window, which earns only 3.35 per cent annually, shows the extent of surplus liquidity in the system and few takers for their funds. In other words, there is a problem of both “supply” of credit by banks and no “demand” from borrowers, be it cash-strapped firms or insecure households.

What can the RBI do? A major reason why banks aren’t making fresh loans is uncertainty over the fate of their existing loans. Following the COVID-19-induced lockdown, borrowers were offered a moratorium on payment of any interest or principal amounts due between March 1 and August 31. RBI data shows around half of the total outstanding bank loans being under moratorium as on April 30. The prospect of many of these turning into non-performing assets (NPA) once the six-month repayment holiday ends is a concern. The RBI has done well to allow a one-time restructuring of all loans that weren’t NPAs before March 1, while continuing to treat these as standard assets. But the important thing is to enable such restructuring to take place quickly without imposing too many conditions. Give banks the freedom to decide on the borrowers whose loans are deserving of being restructured — remember, they weren’t defaulters before the novel coronavirus struck — and ensure this is done transparently. Banks, ultimately, need to get back to the business of lending.

Creating conditions for banks to be in a position to “supply” credit will, of course, not solve the problem of “demand”. That can happen only with economic activity reviving, for which the onus lies more on the government than the RBI. The economic machine today has stalled because nobody’s really spending. The government must spend — rather invest — to​​ --- (1) ---​​ the wheels of commerce. Once the economy starts moving, it will not only revive credit​​ demand, but also improve the cash flows and debt servicing abilities of firms. And that would ease the NPA problems of banks as well.

Source

  • Which word in the passage means disinclination?

  • Aversion

  • Onus

  • Moratorium

  • Liquidity

 

  • The best suited word for (1) is

  • Water

  • Soil

  • Grease

  • Place

 

  • Which one of the following will be an effect of moving economy?

  • Eradication of Poverty

  • Improvement of cash flow

  • Financial equality

  • None of the above

 

  • The onus of Reviving economic activity lies on

  • More on Government and less on RBI

  • More on RBI and less on Government

  • On RBI and Government

  • Neither on Government nor on RBI

 

  • The problem of demand will be solved by

  • Supplying credit will

  • Revived economic activity

  • Reviving credit demand

  • Both (a) and (b)

Answers

Passage 1

  • (a)

  • (a)

  • (c)

  • (a)

  • (d)

Passage 2

  • (a)

  • (c)

  • (b)

  • (a)

  • (b)

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Aditya Anand
Aditya is 93.1% sure that he knows Japanese. We think he speaks Japanese in Bhojpuri accent.

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